Beginner Photography Tips For Quality Photos

Table of Content-

  • Landscape Photography Tips

  • Beginner Photography Tips For Quality Photos

  • Fashion Photography Tips For Best Photos


Landscape Photography Tips


Have you ever wondered how professional photographers take these magnificent landscape photos we see in magazines like National Geographic and others of the sort?


Well, today you're going to learn some landscape photography tips which are being used by the best in the industry.


Landscapes are wonderful on their own, even a standard digital camera can capture its beauty, but if you want a truly memorable image there are some general landscaping photography tips you can make use of.




Rather than focusing on equipment alone, we're also going to include some invaluable techniques for you to implement.


You don't need a state of the art camera and we know not everyone can afford one of these; therefore we've included a few landscape photography tips anyone can use.


Typically, if you're looking for a camera specifically for shooting landscape images, find one which has a wide-range or fish-eye lens, these are ideal for landscape photos.


Since most landscape photography tips mostly advise on how to take wide range shots, many leave out the fact that you can get great pictures with a narrow depth as well.


If you're feeling experimental and want to try something new, then set your aperture settings to "small". This will create a great in-depth photo if mixed with a high ISO and lengthier shutter setting, since the light is reduced when setting the aperture to small.



Also, always use a tripod. This is not only one of the vital landscape photography tips but a must for professional photography in general.

This will avoid getting a blurry effect on the finished production, to maximize the quality even further, always use a remote control as to pressing the capture button manually on the camera itself.


The next important aspect to landscape photography I want to mention, is to always have a good focal point to draw the viewers attention. This will prevent the viewers eyes from wandering all over, wondering what the picture is actually about.


A remarkable tree, mountain or old building is perfect. You also want to consider the foreground for your image, as this is the first thing the viewer will focus on.


If you're more focused on the background rather than foreground, making use of natural lines can be a great subconscious method of drawing the viewer's attention and directing it wherever you please.


These "lines" can be a riverbed, a tree's branch or even the dotted lines in a road. This is one of the ignored landscape photography tips many sites fail to mention and the effect is fantastic.


When it comes to the skyline, some of the leading photographers around the world claim that they only take landscape photos either at dusk or at dawn. These are the times of day that the world looks most alive and provides picture perfect natural lightening mixed with extravagant colors.


Following these few landscape photography tips can make a major difference in how a person will view the photos, how long they'll stay focused and how likely they are to recommend you to a friend.



See Also- Interesting Photography Tips


Beginner Photography Tips For Quality Photos


You Have Been Warned:


This is an extremely long post, one of which that does not contain any technical photography tips, but instead focuses on simple yet powerful photography tips for the beginner just starting out.


With that in mind, I'd strongly advise you to read through the whole article, even if you're an average amateur, just to freshen up on the mental aspect of photography. I've never written an article on my way of thinking when taking pictures, but I think it's cool because it's not like your everyday photography tip article.


So read on for a few secrets, along with a few photos, of course.


Learn To See Creatively


The best way to learn to see creatively is to take more photos. The reason being is because the more pictures you take and the more time you spend on your photography, the more you will begin to see things you would normally never see.


The eyes of a true photographer, or artist, sees shapes, patterns, light and color when walking down an ally or across a street. For example, let's imagine I took a photo of a railroad track at night in a big city:


I saw a good photo because of the 1) light reflecting off the metal 2) the contrasts in color between the wood and metal 3) the strong diagonal lines of the track leading from edge-to-edge.


Before I learned how to see creatively, I've probably walked over that railroad track a million times and not once have I seen it the way I do now.


All these things added together create a great picture for the eye. That's good and all, but, the photo is missing a strong message.


It doesn't emit a strong enough feeling/emotion when one views the photo. To get that, you gotta:


Feel The Moment


If the following makes any sense what-so-ever, it's that I believe everyone has the ability to see creatively in their own personal way.


To see creatively is, in my opinion, to set your mind free and get in-tune with your feelings. These feelings are what drive powerful photographs.


And if you can get your brain, eyes and camera to link with your feelings then you've just opened up a door that has the potential for you to become a great photographer.


You want people to feel your photos; To get a strong emotional reaction because it's all about the feeling, the impact and the structural composition of a photo. There are just a few key steps to improve the feel and impact of your photos, making them into memorable masterpieces.


It's certainly not as easy as you'd think and definitely not something you can learn in a few hours or a few days. It may take weeks, months and sometimes years. It's all up to you and how much time and devotion you spend taking photos and learning photography.


When you are out shooting and see something you want to take a picture of, stop and ask yourself these three questions:


Why do I want to take this photo?


What is the main message of the photo?


How am I going to take the picture effectively?


Keep asking yourself these three questions before you press the shutter and, I promise you, there will be an improvement in your photos.


Let me explain the questions in more detail:

The question "why do I want to take this photo" forces you to explain your feelings. You did after all stop to take the photo because you "felt" it could be a good photo.


But why?


Was it because the light was good?


Was there something extraordinary happening? The more you ask yourself why and the more you answer why, the more you'll start to feel the moment and start seeing creatively.



Remember, it's all about feeling and communicating that feeling to the viewer.


So now that you know why you want to take the photo, you have to ask yourself, "what is the main message of the photo?"


This question will better refine the first question, helping you define the actual subject whether it be exquisite shapes and colors or a person whose face tells a story of a life-long struggling journey. Whatever it is, it prepares you for the next question:


"How am I going to take the picture effectively?" Well, you can start by thinking of the first two questions and what their answers were.